Types of Window Locks


Wanting to change your window locks and are in the search for a new one? Then you may be interested in learning about different types of window locks. Knowing which type of window locks will be a good match can be a little overwhelming when you don’t know what you’re doing—the reason why today, we’ll be telling about types of window locks.

Window locks are important because they enable your windows to be secured at all times, providing you with peace of mind. Needless to say, window locks offer important benefits. When choosing one, key elements must be considered before you make any big decisions.

By knowing different types of window locks, you’ll be making the right choice when it comes to keeping your home safe. Continue reading and check out different types of window locks, where to find them, and more.

Types of Window Locks FAQ’s

What are window pin locks?

Pin Locks are large pins that fit in a window frame to hold it closed. They work with single-hung, double-hung, and slider-type windows. All you need to install a pin lock is a drill and some screws.

How do you stop a window from opening all the way?

You can achieve this by installing a chain lock (the same type used on doors) to limit the distance the window will open. For maximum security, fasten it to the sash and frame with the longest screws that the window will accommodate. For additional protection, install a keyed lock along the sash rail.

Can uPVC window locks be replaced?

It is sometimes possible to replace the malfunctioning handle and lock with an exact match, so it’s always best to have the old one with you when looking for a replacement. The lock and handle must be removed first, so make sure the window is closed, and the handle should lift off.

How do I open windows with sidelocks?

  • Find out if the window is open and push it with your hands. If this doesn’t work, place a prybar between the window and the windowsill. Jiggle the window a little, and it will move and be able to slide or come off. But this procedure might not work if you are latched.
  • Put the blade of a thin hacksaw in the window close to the latch. But this method only works if you put the blade between the window sashes and flip the lock.
  • Another way to open a locked sliding window is to break the lock. This process may sound extreme, but that is a great way to go, except you don’t want to damage your window. You can choose to use a prybar on the latch and force the window open.

Why are window locks important?

Window locks are an important safety feature. Their main job is to help keep intruders from entering your home. These become even more relevant if you have young children living in your home; windows must be locked at all times. The right window locks will also make you eligible to take out home insurance.

Do all windows need locks?

It’s totally up to you; you may decide that windows in second-story bedrooms do not need a lock; however, certain areas need window locks without a doubt. Your basement, front windows, and any windows on the first level and aren’t protected by a fence should definitely have window locks. Otherwise, these become easy targets for burglars.

Types of Window Locks

Keyed locks

These are often used to secure double-hung windows. They are installed on the side of your window and will secure it to its frame. It is important to keep the key that these locks require secured at a place and not lose it.

Window latches for additional security

These are often seen on locks for single and double-hung windows that are not made of standard UPVC. With window latches, you can expect to be installed on the top of a window sash. As well as providing a layer of security, they can also stop heat from escaping from your windows and create a seal to keep the cold out.

Child safety window latches

These only open at a certain degree, preventing windows from being fully open. This is great to keep your home ventilated without the risk of your children accidentally falling out.

Sliding window lock

As the name indicates, this type of lock is for sliding windows. The lock, which can come in a bar, a sash, or a wedge, is installed on the track to prevent the window from being opened.

Push-lock

A push-lock is a kind of lock installed both on sliding, awning, and double-hung windows. It is a locking bolt that can be pushed to lock and opened with a key.

Window pin lock

A window pin lock is a type of lock that uses two separate parts; one installed on the window itself and one on the window frame.

Smart Locks

Instead of a key, Smart locks require a code, or you can also open them using your smartphone. While you will most often find smart locks on front and back doors, sensors exist for windows. Sensors can tell you if your window is locked or unlocked, closed or open, allowing you to monitor the safety of your home.

Ventilating Locks

A ventilating lock is installed above the sash on the window frame. It has a moveable pin that prevents it from opening all the way when placed above the window. If the pin is pushed aside, the window can open fully.

Hinged Wedge Locks

A hinged wedge lock prevents a double-hung window from opening. If installed directly above the sash, it can keep a closed window from opening until you push the lock inward to allow the window to open fully. If placed higher on the window frame, the window can be opened partially but without the ability to open it further unless the lock is pushed inward.

Where to find Different types of Window Locks

Lion Locks Sliding Window

Secure your patio door, sliding glass door, and both horizontal & Vertical sliding windows. Ideal for securing a vertical window air conditioner or window fan setup.
Made of heavy-duty aluminum, the lock includes a vinyl lining to prevent you from scratching your window frame. The vinyl insert provides additional gripping power when locking your windows down.
These window locks are easy to install with double door lock thumb screws.

types of window locks: Lion Locks Sliding Window

Features:

  • Childproof
  • Durable
  • No tools needed

Sliding Window Security Lock

Extruded aluminum lock with steel thumbscrew for use on metal horizontal sliding windows. Finish by tightening thumbscrew with pliers to securely lock windows.

types of window locks: Sliding Window Security Lock

Features:

  • Allows window to lock in ventilating position
  • Easy to Install
  • Secondary Lock

Defender Security Wood Window Flip-Lock

This stainless steel constructed window lock easily mounts on your vertical track. It helps stop your window in a ventilating position. The wedge flips out of the way to allow your window to open.

types of window locks: Defender Security Wood Window Flip-Lock

Features:

  • Flip-lock mounts on a vertical track
  • Stops window in vent position
  • Installation screws included

Window Security Bar with Child-Proof Lock

This sliding window security bar with a childproof anti-lift lock can block the sliding portion of a window to prevent it from opening from the outside.

Made of aluminum, this sliding window lock easily slides from 10.6 to 16.625 inches and can be installed without cutting; it allows the window to partially open while being secured.

This window security bar is short and is not designed for fixed windows or single windows.

types of window locks: Window Security Bar with Child-Proof Lock

Features:

  • Childproof Anti-Lift Lock
  • Easy to install
  • Swings Up

SimpliSafe Entry Sensor – Window and Door Protection

This sensor fits on all types of doors and windows. Place it on any door or window and ‘add device’ With your SimpliSafe Keypad.
Chimes when your door or window opens, letting you know someone is entering.
Ready to work right out of the box, your entry sensor comes pre-installed with batteries and adhesive.

types of window locks: SimpliSafe Entry Sensor - Window and Door Protection

Features:

  • Pre-installed
  • SimpliSafe home security system
  • Add up to 100 sensors